Please correct the errors below.

Soundslice store content policy

For all content in your course, including the music, you must either own the copyright or have obtained the necessary rights to use and sell the content. By making a course available for sale on Soundslice, you certify that you have the right to sell it.

Confused? Here are some examples:

  • Selling a course about a general technique or musical genre, using your own self-produced audio/video and musical ideas, is permitted.
  • Selling a course about how to play specific pieces of music that are in the public domain — such as “Auld Lang Syne” — is permitted.
  • Selling a course about how to play specific pieces of music for which you haven’t secured the rights — such as Led Zeppelin tunes that you haven’t licensed from a music publisher — is not permitted.
  • Selling a transcription of a recording for which you haven’t secured the rights — such as a John Coltrane saxophone solo that you haven’t licensed from a music publisher — is not permitted.

As with all materials that you create on Soundslice — whether they are for sale or not — you retain any intellectual property rights in the content you upload or post. You grant Soundslice a license to use the content (e.g., so that it can appear in your course on soundslice.com). See our sitewide Terms of Service for this more formally stated.

I’ve made my own arrangement of a song. Can I sell a transcription of that arrangement?

No, not without permission from the publisher. Unlike making an audio/video cover of a popular song, producing sheet music or printed arrangements (even your own arrangements) require a special “print” license. The moment an arrangement is penned, it is owned by the song’s publisher, and an agreement needs to be made with them to sell it.

How can I contact a publisher?

Disclaimer: it can be difficult to track this information down. Publishers can be big companies, mom-and-pop shops or a single person. On top of that, a single song can have multiple publishers. You can search these popular repertory databases for the contact information of given song’s publisher:

If you find that your desired song’s publisher is Warner Music

…there is a good chance that you can obtain a print license using this tool from Alfred Music.