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Posts tagged with “Practice”

Today we’re excited to announce several improvements and new features for the Practice section of Soundslice, the suite of practice tools we launched earlier this year. Let’s dive in!

Edit and delete private notes

You can finally edit private notes — or delete them entirely. Great for fixing typos or adding insights you forgot to include originally.

Click the pencil icon to the right of each private note to open the editing interface:

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For more details, see the help page.

View extended slice practice history

You can now quickly view your practice history for any slice — beyond the default seven-day view. Just click “See more”:

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Rename slices in practice lists

Let’s say you purchased a course from our store but the course’s slices use names like “Part 4(b)” that don’t make sense in your practice list. Or you bookmarked a community slice but its title has one too many emojis for your liking.

Renaming to the rescue!

You can now rename any slice in a practice list, to make it easier for you to find and understand. Renaming is private to you. For more details, see “Renaming slices” on this help page.

Access saved loops more quickly

You gotta love our saved loops feature, where you can save a specific subset of music for quick access.

Now, we’ve made it even easier to access them. When you’re in a practice list and view its list of slices, we now display the saved loops for each slice...

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...and you can click any saved loop name to immediately open that slice with that specific saved loop active. This saves you a few clicks and gets you to practicing even sooner.

A related bonus for power users: saved loops are now bookmarkable in your web browser. (That is, they have a distinct URL that can be bookmarked.)

Dedicated pages for each practice list

Each of your practice lists now has its own dedicated web page, with the full list of slices and the last-practiced date for each. This can help you quickly get a sense of what you haven’t practiced lately.

New design for lists of practice lists

On your main Soundslice homepage and Practice page, we used to display the first four slices for each of your practice lists. Now, we’ve simplified this — we simply display a big, single image for each practice list.

The upshot is that it’s easier to see all of your practice lists, because previously they tended to get buried behind all of the slices.

New mobile navigation

If you’re viewing our site on a phone (and you’re logged in), you’ll notice we’ve added app-like navigation on many pages. It’s the bottom row of icons shown here:

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This gives you quick ways to access the primary sections of our site — including the overview, the slice manager and the practice area.

It works particularly well if you’ve installed Soundslice in your phone’s home screen. (Highly recommended!)

Big news today: we’ve launched a new suite of practice tools, all focused on helping you make the most of the music you have in Soundslice.

We’ve been working for nearly 10 years now on perfecting our player — the core Soundslice experience, combining sheet music with audio/video for multi-dimensional learning. In our opinion, it’s the single best tool for learning and practicing any piece of music.

But beyond specific pieces of music, what about the bigger picture? How do you manage what you’re practicing, how do you stay motivated, and what tools can we provide to help your practice in a broader sense? We’re interested in zooming out — providing more connective tissue for your music-learning life.

Our new practice tools are the first step in addressing this. Here’s an overview of what’s new.

Practice lists

There are many parts to Soundslice, and you as a student can access content in many ways — from a teacher, from our store, from our friendly community or by transcribing or creating sheet music yourself.

Alas, up until now, these areas have been relatively segregated. When you log into your Soundslice account, there are separate sections for courses you’ve purchased, slices shared privately by your teacher, posts from the community and slices you’ve created yourself.

Now there’s a way to organize it all in one place.

Practice lists are a way to bundle slices together, in a specific order, for your own benefit. For example, a practice list could contain a handful of slices you created yourself, plus an Antoine Boyer etude you bought, plus an arrangement from Jake Estner’s channel.

It’s totally open-ended, and you can have multiple lists. You could have a “Warmup routine” practice list, plus a “Working on” list, plus a “Tunes for March 15 gig” list.

You’ll now see a “Practice lists” button at the top of every slice page (assuming you’re logged in). This is how you can add a slice to one of your practice lists, and it looks like this:

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Every Soundslice account gets a free practice list called “Bookmarks” by default. Our previous bookmarks system has been migrated to this and retired. If you used that system, your bookmarks have been automatically imported into your “Bookmarks” practice list.

The ability to create custom practice lists is now available for any Soundslice user in a paid plan. (The Plus plan is the cheapest, at 5 bucks a month — a good deal.) For more on practice lists, see our new help section.

Practicing slices

Organizing slices into lists is all well and good, but we’re launching more than just that today. When you view a slice in context of a practice list, you’ll get all of the Soundslice features you know and love — but you’ll also get some additional functionality.

The first thing you might notice is the left part of the page — it’s a special sidebar only visible for slices in practice lists:

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On smaller screens such as phones, you won’t see this sidebar by default. Open the sidebar by tapping this icon at the top of the page:

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The practice sidebar has three sections, each of which is a brand new Soundslice feature launched today.

Practice log

The practice log is a lightweight way to track your practice history. It’s super simple and (in our experience) provides an extra bit of motivation. Don’t break the streak!

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These circles represent the last seven calendar days, including today. (Today is always on the right.) For each day you practiced this piece of music, the circle is green. This quickly shows you your practice streak.

When you’ve practiced the slice for the day, just click that button to mark it as practiced:

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Man, that’s satisfying.

The practice log on an individual slice only shows seven days, for simplicity. But you can access your full practice history (at least since you started using Soundslice’s practice tools) to dive deeper.

For more info, see the new help page on practice tracking.

Private notes

The second new thing you’ll see on slice practice pages is called private notes. This is a way for you to write down reflections on what you’re learning, breakthroughs on technique, your current best BPM, etc.

These notes are completely private to you. Nobody else can see them, even if the slice is technically owned by somebody else (for example, if you’ve added a community post to your practice list).

It’s a simple and intuitive system, and you can read more about it here.

Saved loops

This one is my favorite! Remember how we launched focus mode back in November? It’s the feature that lets you select an arbitrary section of music and hide everything else, helping you focus.

You can now save a focus mode section, so that you can return to it quickly any time. Essentially this is a way to bookmark a “slice of a slice.”

For any slice in a practice list, simply drag across any part of your notation to create a loop. Then click the “...” button at the upper right of the selection and choose “Save loop.”

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We’ll automatically enter focus mode for your selected section of music, and you’ll be prompted to give the saved loop a name. By default we’ll use the bar range you’ve selected.

When you’ve done that, the newly created saved loop will appear in the sidebar:

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Once you’ve created saved loops, it’s very fast and easy to access them. Just click any of the names in the saved loops section of the practice sidebar, and your notation will instantly enter focus mode with the specific loop selected:

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Playback will automatically loop, and all other notation will magically be hidden — removing distraction and letting you focus on the subset of music.

See our new help page on saved loops for more, and enjoy!

The new practice homepage

And lastly: if you’re logged into your Soundslice account, you’ll now notice a new Practice link in the navigation:

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This page is basically the command center for all of our new practice features. It lets you create (and access) practice lists, and it shows you your practice history.

Next steps

We’re excited about these new features and excited to hear your thoughts about them. Your feedback will help guide us: where should we take this next? Drop a comment below or contact us. Hope you enjoy the new features!

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